Viewing Audit Events

The Audit app shows activities in your Liferay DXP installation. Access it by navigating to Control PanelConfigurationAudit. The app displays a searchable list of captured events. You can browse the list, but searching it is typically faster.

This figure shows that John Watson logged in and performed some actions on the site. Click an entry to view details about any of these events.

Figure 1: The Audit app displays the events it captures in a searchable list.

Figure 1: The Audit app displays the events it captures in a searchable list.

Figure 2: Click an event in the list to show its details. The details for this event show that John Watson updated his user accounts prefixId from 1 to 4. The prefixId represents a name prefix like Dr., Mr., Mrs., or Ms.

Figure 2: Click an event in the list to show its details. The details for this event show that John Watson updated his user account's `prefixId` from `1` to `4`. The `prefixId` represents a name prefix like Dr., Mr., Mrs., or Ms.

As you can see, depending on how many users you have, this list can get populated very quickly. That’s why page view events aren’t displayed by default. They’ll clutter up your audit report, since they’ll definitely be the most frequent event.

Finding Audit Events

Finding what you want in a big list of events is like searching for a needle in a haystack. This is why the Audit app has a robust search mechanism. By default, it looks pretty simple: there’s only a single search field. Clicking the magnifier icon next to the search bar, however, reveals an advanced search dialog broken out by various fields you can use in your search.

Here are the available search options:

Match: Search for matches to all the fields you’ve specified or any single field.

User ID: The user ID to search for. This is usually the User who performed some action you’d like to audit.

User Name: The user name to search for. This is often easier than searching for a user ID, especially if you don’t have access to the database containing the user ID.

Resource ID: The ID of the resource that was modified or viewed in this audit record.

Class Name: The name of the resource that was modified or viewed in this audit record. For example, you could search for user resources to see if someone modified a user’s account.

Resource Action: An action performed on the resource. This could be any of these: add, assign, delete, impersonate, login, login_failure, logout, unassign, or update.

Session ID: The session ID to search for. You can use this to correlate a session ID from your web server logs with activity in Liferay DXP.

Client IP: The IP address of the client that performed the activity you wish to audit.

Client Host: The host name of the client that performed the activity you wish to audit.

Server Name: The name of the server in which the activity occurred. If you’re using a cluster, each member of the cluster can be individually queried.

Server Port: The server port in which the activity occurred. You need this if you run a vertical cluster of multiple VMs on the same machine.

Start Date: The low end of the date range you wish to search for.

End Date: The high end of the date range you wish to search.

For example, to check if someone unassigned a User from a particular Role, you might search for a resource name of user and a resource action of unassign. Once you have the search results, you can click any of the returned records to see that record’s detail page.

Figure 3: Searching for audit events is easy with the Audit apps advanced search form. You can specify various search criteria to find the types of events you want.

Figure 3: Searching for audit events is easy with the Audit app's advanced search form. You can specify various search criteria to find the types of events you want.

Figure 4: This record shows that the default administrative user removed the Power User Role from the User Test Test.

Figure 4: This record shows that the default administrative user removed the Power User Role from the User Test Test.

As you can see, the Audit app shows you what’s happening as Users make changes. Use this information to troubleshoot problems, determine ownership of particular actions, or, as Harry (from the story in the introduction) is about to do, find out who made permission changes they weren’t supposed to make.

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