Creating Data Definitions

Imagine this: The Lunar Resort is becoming a popular destination. The Recreation Department’s offerings (hiking, lunar golf, rover races, and more) are very popular with the adventurous guests, and it’s becoming difficult for Recreation Department employees to keep up with demand. An unexpected number of participants in a lunar hike makes it so that the Lunar Sherpa (hiking guide) has to scramble to find enough space suits for all the guests involved, and the kitchen staff needs to rummage up more food at the last minute so that the hikers have enough to eat. The lack of efficiency could be dangerous, and cost the resort much needed revenue if guests are unhappy with the experience. The resort needs a way for guests to sign up for events ahead of time. If you’re thinking that means you need to hire developers to build you an app, you’re wrong! Liferay gives you, the administrator (or anyone with the proper permissions), the power to build a simple list app using the Dynamic Data Lists application, with no coding involved.

The Lunar Resort has a public site for guests. On that site, there’s a page called Activities Sign-Up, where guests can sign up for activities led by the Recreation Department, or for the upcoming Lunar Luau, a Hawaiian themed dinner party on the Moon! It’s important to know which guests are attending which activities, since any lunar activity requires special equipment, considerations, and preparation. You need to do two things:

  1. Provide guests with sign-up forms.
  2. Access the guest lists to view the entries.

These are basically simple applications, that take user input and store the data somewhere. While you don’t need to be a developer to make this happen, you do need to be familiar with data definitions, data lists, and templates. You probably also need a user group of List Creators who have permission to create lists and access the entries.

When list creators sign in to the Lunar Resort portal, you want to make it easy for them to build lists. To this end, you’ll provide one or more data definitions that should suit most of their list making needs. Not everyone needs to be an expert in Dynamic Data Lists (but you do, so keep reading).

What are these data definitions? They’re just collections of different field types, configured in a certain way, to guide users in providing data for your lists. All lists are backed by a data definition, so this is the place to start in building a list app. An exhaustive discussion of the field types available and their configuration options is found at the end of this article. Next, get started creating data definitions.

Creating Data Definitions

The Lunar Resort List creators can’t post and manage lists unless you give them some useful definitions. You can, of course, delegate the data definition responsibilities to the list creators, if you want. The following directions apply to whoever has the permissions to access the DDL application. Create some data definitions and set your list creators to work.

  1. Make sure you’re logged in as an administrator, then open the site administration menu for the site you’re working on. Click ContentDynamic Data Lists.

  2. To create a data definition, find the icon (Configuration Menu) for the Dynamic Data List configuration menu. Click on it and select Manage Data Definitions. The Data Definitions window appears, where you can access existing definitions or create new ones.

    Figure 1: The portal ships with several commonly used predefined data definitions that  can be used as is or modified to build your lists. You can also add your own data definitions.

    Figure 1: The portal ships with several commonly used predefined data definitions that can be used as is or modified to build your lists. You can also add your own data definitions.

  3. Click the Add icon (Add Icon) to add a new Data Definition.

  4. Fill out the Title and Description fields. Since this definition will be used for multiple lists (because there are multiple activities the resort needs lists for), name it Activity Entry. Beware that the Title you give the data definition will appear to portal users who are adding a record to your list. There will be a button that users click to Add a [Definition Title]. A good description might be This definition should cover most use cases on the Activities Sign-Up page. Modify the templates to suit your specific needs.

    Below the Description field, there’s a Parent Data Definition selector. The Activity Entry definition won’t use any of the pre-configured definitions as a parent, so leave it blank and scroll down to the data definition designer. The View tab is displayed by default, and that’s where you’ll probably do most of your work. You can, however, click Source mode to manually customizing a definition’s XML file. This method is likely to be useful for more experienced users and developers.

    Figure 2: You can add and configure fields to form a custom list definition.

    Figure 2: You can add and configure fields to form a custom list definition.

  5. To start, drag a Text field from the Fields tab (in View mode) onto the canvas. This will eventually become a required field called Full Name. Below the Text field, drop a Radio field. Drop four Boolean fields, and finish this section with a Select field. While doing this you might have noticed you can nest fields below each other. Nest all the fields you just added below the Text field.

    Figure 3: Fields can be nested below other fields.

    Figure 3: Fields can be nested below other fields.

  6. Before adding more fields, configure the current ones. Click on the Text field and then click on the wrench icon (Configure DDL Field Icon). Alternatively, click on the field and then click the Settings tab.

    Figure 4: Fields can be configured in a variety of ways.

    Figure 4: Fields can be configured in a variety of ways.

    • Double click the Field Label and change it to Full Name. Click Save.

    Figure 5: You can give your fields appropriate field labels.

    Figure 5: You can give your fields appropriate field labels.

    • Double click the Required setting and change it to Yes, then click Save.

    Figure 6: You can make your fields required.

    Figure 6: You can make your fields required.

  7. Next, configure the Radio field.

    • Change the Field Label to Sex.

    • Configure the field Options to be Male and Female, and feel free to set the values for the options to male and female. Only the Options will be displayed to users. Remove the unused Option.

    Figure 7: You can add and configure fields to form a custom list definition.

    Figure 7: You can add and configure fields to form a custom list definition.

  8. Now create and configure DDL data definition fields to make the definition look like this image:

![Figure 8: You can add and configure fields to form a custom list definition.](../../../images/ddl-name-and-more.png)

- The options for the Select field  wtih the label *How fit are you?* should be *Fit as a
  fiddle!*, *Moderately fit, I think.*, and *Bring extra oxygen.*
  1. That’s a good start to the form. To make sure all Activity Sign-Up use cases are covered, add the following fields to the data definition:
  • Documents and Media field called Profile Picture.
  • A Radio field called Preferred Rover Style with these options:
    • Uranus (light blue)
    • Jupiter (orange and white)
    • Mars (red)
  • A Geolocation field with the label Tell other guests where you’re from. Optional.
  • A Text Box field with the label Tell us something about yourself.
  1. Once you finish adding and configuring fields, click Save.

Your new data definition will now appear in a list with all of the pre-configured definitions.

Figure 9: You can add and configure fields to form a custom list definition.

Figure 9: You can add and configure fields to form a custom list definition.

If you click on the newly created definition (or any definition, for that matter), you’ll notice that you have access to both a WebDAV URL and a static URL, which are used to access the XML source of the data definition. To learn more about WebDAV or if you’d like to see WebDAV in action, see the article on WebDAV access

.

Using a Parent Definition

Though it wasn’t necessary for the use case presented above, data definitions also have the capability of inheriting characteristics from other definitions. When a parent data definition is configured, the child definition inherits the parent’s fields and settings. Using this feature is helpful when you want to make a similar data definition to one that’s already created. For instance, if you’d like to create an advanced sign-up sheet in addition to a regular sign-up sheet, you can simply inherit the characteristics of the regular sheet and only add the additional fields necessary for the advanced sheet. When the advanced sheet is configured, it will display its parent’s fields in addition to its own fields.

If you wanted the Sales Department to fill out a form to help keep inventory of the Lunar Resort store’s items, you could build a list based on the Inventory Definition that comes shipped with Liferay. It has some useful fields already configured, but the existing Inventory data definition isn’t enough. You want to give Lunar Resort employees a chance to rate the popularity of each item they’re filling out the Inventory form for. Just create a new definition, define the Inventory definition as a Parent, and add the fields you need.

Figure 10: You can create a child definition to add new fields to a pre-existing one.

Figure 10: You can create a child definition to add new fields to a pre-existing one.

When you create a list (you can call it Inventory List) based on the new definition (probably called something like Inventory Record), it will include the fields you added and the fields of the existing definition. This way, whoever is in charge of maintaining the Inventory definition gets the information they want, and you get the information you want.

Figure 11: You can create a child definition to add new fields to a pre-existing one. Your definition now lives with all the pre-configured ones. There are several things you can do with these existing definitions, including deleting them, editing them, and copying them.

Figure 11: You can create a child definition to add new fields to a pre-existing one.

Managing Data Definitions

From a site’s Dynamic Data Lists application (accessed through the Product Menu), you can either add a new dynamic data list from an existing data type or you can click Manage Data Definitions from the Actions button to add or edit data definitions.

Figure 12: You can manage the portals data definitions.

Figure 12: You can manage the portal's data definitions.

There are several data definition management actions you can perform. Of course, you can edit a data definition, but you can also configure its permissions, manage its templates, copy it, or delete it.

Figure 13: You can copy an existing data definition, manage its templates, and more.

Figure 13: You can copy an existing data definition, manage its templates, and more.

If you edit a data definition that has references (from your lists or templates), you’ll need to account for that, by editing the template, for instance.

Figure 14: Youll be warned if you try to edit a data definition thats referenced in a template.

Figure 14: You'll be warned if you try to edit a data definition that's referenced in a template.

Copying Data Definitions

Liferay Portal 6.2 introduced the ability to Copy the DDM structures and templates associated with an existing data definition. You can access the Copy button by navigating to Manage Data Definitions and clicking the Actions button (the icon is a vertical ellipsis). Select Copy from the actions menu. The Copy menu opens, and includes options for copying the form and display templates associated with the data definition. You’ll learn how to manage and create new form and display templates later. When you’re finished, the copied data definition can be accessed in the Manage Data Definitions menu. The Copy feature lets you create new data definitions based on existing ones. In one action you can copy a data definition with its templates, and then you can modify it to suit your needs. You can, of course, edit any definition in the portal, but if you copy a definition instead, you’ll still have access to the original.

Figure 15: You can copy an existing data definitions DDM structures and templates.

Figure 15: You can copy an existing data definition's DDM structures and templates.

From the actions menu for a data definition, you can also configure its permissions.

Data Definition Permissions

From a data definition’s Actions menu, you can select Permissions to configure the permissions for a particular data definition. Note that these permissions are for an individual definition accessed through the DDL application in Site Administration (from the Product Menu, go to SitesContentDynamic Data Lists). For example, by default a Site Member can View the Activity Entry Data Definition. Any Site Member who was also assigned a role that can access the DDL application and its data definitions would see this definition listed in the Manage Data Definitions list. If you don’t want this, just deselect View for Site Member, and these users won’t see your data definition listed with the others.

Figure 16: You can configure the permissions on an existing data definition.

Figure 16: You can configure the permissions on an existing data definition.

You can manage a data definition’s templates as well.

Managing a Data Definition’s Templates

Manage a data definition’s templates by clicking Manage Templates from a data definition’s actions menu (click the Configuration Menu icon).

Figure 17: You can manage the templates associated with a data definition.

Figure 17: You can manage the templates associated with a data definition.

You can copy templates if you want to create a new template that’s similar to an existing one, or you can edit them directly. You can also configure permissions for a template, and delete templates. All of these are accomplished by clicking the actions button for a template. For more information see the article on Using Templates to Display Forms and Lists.

Configuring Data Definition Fields

You already know how to create data definitions, and if you created the example definition, you’ve added and configured some of the field types that can be used in your definitions. But there’s more to know about the field types and their configuration options.

There are many different types of fields to choose from when creating data definitions:

Boolean fields present a checkbox to the user and stores either a true (checked) or false (unchecked) based on state.

Date fields are preformatted text fields that display a convenient date picker to assist in selecting the desired date. The format for the date is governed by the current locale.

Decimal fields are similar to Number fields, but require that a decimal point be present.

Documents and Media fields allow users to select an existing uploaded document to attach to the data record. Users can also upload documents into the Document Library.

Geolocation fields are integrated with Google Maps, and allow users to enter an address, which is then displayed on a map.

HTML fields present an area that uses a WYSIWYG editor to enhance the content.

Integer fields are similar to Number fields, but constrain user input to non-fractional numbers.

Link to Page fields allow insertion of a link to another page in the same site.

Number fields provide a text box that only allows numeric input, but put no constraints on the kind of number entered.

Radio fields presents are similar to Select fields, presenting the user with a list of options to choose from using radio button inputs. The values are stored as strings, and only one option can be chosen.

Select fields provide the user options for the user to choose from using a combo box. Unlike Radio fields, Select fields can be configured to allow multiple selections.

Text fields are areas where any string input can be entered.

Text Box fields are larger text areas for longer text input.

If you’re in the Dynamic Data List’s Add Data Definition section, you add these fields to a definition by dragging them from the palette on the left to the work area on the right.

You can also customize the appearance of input fields and provide helpful tips and hints for those entering data. Some data types have specific configuration options but all have some in common. Field properties can be edited in several ways: by double-clicking on the field, by clicking the wrench icon in the upper-right corner of the field,or by clicking the Settings tab when the field is selected:

The Type setting can’t be edited, but can be referenced from a display template. It lists the type of field placed in the definition, and is available to reference from a display template.

Edit the Field Label to set the text that’s displayed with the field.

The Show Label setting is used to configure whether the field label is shown with the form field.

Required can be set to Yes (it defaults to No), which means the field must have data in it for a new entry to be submitted (not available for Boolean).

The Name property sets the name of the field internally, and is automatically generated. This is the variable name that you can read the data from in a display template, so you should specify a memorable name here.

Set the Predefined Value to provide example data or a default value for the user to start with. The value you enter becomes the field’s default value when adding a new entry.

Use a Tip for the field to provide helpful text that’s displayed in a tooltip, which pops up from a small help icon next to the field.

Set Indexable to Yes if you want Liferay to index your field for search.

Setting Localizable to No turns off localization for a particular field, so that translations cannot be made for that field.

Setting the Repeatable property to Yes lets users add as many copies of this field as they like.

Set the visual Width of the form on the page. It doesn’t affect the field values that will be stored. Possible width values are Small, Medium and Large (not available for Boolean, Documents and Media, Geolocation, Radio, and Select).

Setting Multiple to Yes allows the user to select more than one option. This defaults to No (only available for Select).

Setting the field’s Options changes the options available for selection. You’re able to add and remove options as well as edit each individual option’s display name and value (only available for Radio and Select fields).

Figure 18: The properties of a definitions data fields are configurable. For example, add and edit options for the How fit are you? Select field drop-down menu on the Activity Entry form.

Figure 18: The properties of a definition's data fields are configurable. For example, add and edit options for the *How fit are you?* Select field drop-down menu on the Activity Entry form.

In addition to dragging the fields around on the canvas, you can stack inputs within inputs by dragging a field within another field. You can organize your data into unlimited levels of hierarchy, creating a clear, logical data model. There is also a duplicate button on each field (the button with the plus symbol icon), allowing you to easily clone any field as many times as you need.

Figure 19: Configure data fields by clicking the wrench icon, duplicate fields with the add button (the plus symbol icon), or delete them using the delete button (the trash can icon).

Figure 19: Configure data fields by clicking the wrench icon, duplicate fields with the add button (the plus symbol icon), or delete them using the delete button (the trash can icon).

Once you have a data definition, you and your list creators can use it to start creating lists for users to fill out.

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