Creating an Asset Renderer

In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to create an Asset Renderer and associate your JSP templates with it, along with configuring several other options.

To learn how an asset renderer is created, you’ll create the pre-existing BlogsEntryAssetRenderer class, which configures the asset renderer framework for the Blogs application.

  1. Create a new package in your existing project for your asset-related classes. For instance, the BlogsEntryAssetRenderer class resides in the com.liferay.blogs.web module’s com.liferay.blogs.web.asset package.

  2. Create your -AssetEntry class for your application in the new -.asset package and have it implement the AssetEntry interface. Consider the BlogsEntryAssetRenderer class as an example:

    public class BlogsEntryAssetRenderer
        extends BaseJSPAssetRenderer<BlogsEntry> implements TrashRenderer {
    

    The BlogsEntryAssetRenderer class extends the BaseJSPAssetRenderer, which is an extension class intended for those who plan on using JSP templates to generate their asset’s HTML. The BaseJSPAssetRenderer class implements the AssetRenderer interface. You’ll notice the asset renderer is also implementing the TrashRenderer interface. This is a common practice for many applications, so they can use Liferay DXP’s Recycle Bin.

  3. Define the asset renderer class’s constructor, which typically sets the asset object to use in the asset renderer class.

    public BlogsEntryAssetRenderer(
        BlogsEntry entry, ResourceBundleLoader resourceBundleLoader) {
    
        _entry = entry;
        _resourceBundleLoader = resourceBundleLoader;
    }
    

    The BlogsEntryAssetRenderer also sets the resource bundle loader, which loads the language keys for a module. You can learn more about the resource bundle loader in the Overriding Language Keys tutorial.

    Also, make sure to define the _entry and _resourceBundleLoader fields in the class:

    private final BlogsEntry _entry;
    private final ResourceBundleLoader _resourceBundleLoader;
    
  4. Now that your class declaration and constructor are defined for the blogs asset renderer, you must begin connecting your asset renderer to your asset. The following getter methods accomplish this:

    @Override
    public BlogsEntry getAssetObject() {
        return _entry;
    }
    
    @Override
    public String getClassName() {
        return BlogsEntry.class.getName();
    }
    
    @Override
    public long getClassPK() {
        return _entry.getEntryId();
    }
    
    @Override
    public long getGroupId() {
        return _entry.getGroupId();
    }
    
    @Override
    public String getType() {
        return BlogsEntryAssetRendererFactory.TYPE;
    }
    
    @Override
    public String getUuid() {
        return _entry.getUuid();
    }
    

    The getAssetObject() method sets the BlogsEntry that was set in the constructor as your asset to track. Likewise, the getType() method references the blogs asset renderer factory for the type of asset your asset renderer renders. Of course, the asset renderer type is blog, which you’ll set in the factory later.

  5. Your asset renderer must link to the portlet that owns the entity. In the case of a blogs asset, its portlet ID should be linked to the Blogs application.

    @Override
    public String getPortletId() {
        AssetRendererFactory<BlogsEntry> assetRendererFactory =
            getAssetRendererFactory();
    
        return assetRendererFactory.getPortletId();
    }
    

    The getPortletId() method instantiates an asset renderer factory for a BlogsEntry and retrieves the portlet ID for the portlet used to display blogs entries.

  6. If you’re interested in enabling workflow for your asset, add the following method similar to what was done for the Blogs application:

    @Override
    public int getStatus() {
        return _entry.getStatus();
    }
    

    This method retrieves the workflow status for the asset.

  7. Another popular feature many developers want for their asset is to comment on it. This is enabled for the Blogs application with the following method:

    @Override
    public String getDiscussionPath() {
        if (PropsValues.BLOGS_ENTRY_COMMENTS_ENABLED) {
            return "edit_entry_discussion";
        }
        else {
            return null;
        }
    }
    

    A comments section is an available option if it returns a non-null value. For the comments section to display for your asset, you must enable it in the Asset Publisher’s Options (Options) → ConfigurationSetupDisplay Settings section.

  8. At a minimum, you should create a title and summary for your asset. Here’s how the BlogsEntryAssetRenderer does it:

    @Override
    public String getSummary(
        PortletRequest portletRequest, PortletResponse portletResponse) {
    
        int abstractLength = AssetUtil.ASSET_ENTRY_ABSTRACT_LENGTH;
    
        if (portletRequest != null) {
            abstractLength = GetterUtil.getInteger(
                portletRequest.getAttribute(
                    WebKeys.ASSET_ENTRY_ABSTRACT_LENGTH),
                AssetUtil.ASSET_ENTRY_ABSTRACT_LENGTH);
        }
    
        String summary = _entry.getDescription();
    
        if (Validator.isNull(summary)) {
            summary = HtmlUtil.stripHtml(
                StringUtil.shorten(_entry.getContent(), abstractLength));
        }
    
        return summary;
    }
    
    @Override
    public String getTitle(Locale locale) {
        ResourceBundle resourceBundle =
            _resourceBundleLoader.loadResourceBundle(
                LanguageUtil.getLanguageId(locale));
    
        return BlogsEntryUtil.getDisplayTitle(resourceBundle, _entry);
    }
    

    These two methods return information about your asset, so the asset publisher can display it. The title and summary can be anything.

    The getSummary(...) method for Blogs returns the abstract description for a blog asset. If the abstract description does not exist, the content of the blog is used as an abstract. You’ll learn more about abstracts and other content specifications later.

    The getTitle(...) method for Blogs uses the resource bundle loader you configured in the constructor to load your module’s resource bundle and return the display title for your asset.

  9. If you want to provide a unique URL for your asset, you can specify a URL title. A URL title is the URL used to access your asset directly (e.g., localhost:8080/-/this-is-my-blog-asset). You can do this by providing the following method:

    @Override
    public String getUrlTitle() {
        return _entry.getUrlTitle();
    }
    
  10. Insert the isPrintable() method, which enables the Asset Publisher’s printing capability for your asset.

    @Override
    public boolean isPrintable() {
        return true;
    }
    

    This displays a Print icon when your asset is displayed in the Asset Publisher. For the icon to appear, you must enable it in the Asset Publisher’s OptionsConfigurationSetupDisplay Settings section.

    Figure 1: Enable printing in the Asset Publisher to display the Print icon for your asset.

    Figure 1: Enable printing in the Asset Publisher to display the Print icon for your asset.

  11. If your asset is protected by permissions, you can set permissions for the asset via the asset renderer. See the logic below for an example used in the BlogsEntryAssetRenderer class:

    @Override
    public long getUserId() {
        return _entry.getUserId();
    }
    
    @Override
    public String getUserName() {
        return _entry.getUserName();
    }
    
    public boolean hasDeletePermission(PermissionChecker permissionChecker) {
        return BlogsEntryPermission.contains(
            permissionChecker, _entry, ActionKeys.DELETE);
    }
    
    @Override
    public boolean hasEditPermission(PermissionChecker permissionChecker) {
        return BlogsEntryPermission.contains(
            permissionChecker, _entry, ActionKeys.UPDATE);
    }
    
    @Override
    public boolean hasViewPermission(PermissionChecker permissionChecker) {
        return BlogsEntryPermission.contains(
            permissionChecker, _entry, ActionKeys.VIEW);
    }
    

    Before you can check if a user has permission to view your asset, you must use the getUserId() and getUserName() to retrieve the entry’s user ID and username, respectively. Then there are three boolean permission methods that check if the user can view, edit, or delete your blogs entry. These permissions are for specific entity instances. Global permissions for blog entries are implemented in the factory, which you’ll do later.

Awesome! You’ve learned how to set up the blogs asset renderer to

  • connect to an asset
  • connect to the asset’s portlet
  • use workflow management
  • use a comments section
  • retrieve the asset’s title and summary
  • generate the asset’s unique URL
  • display a print icon
  • check permissions for the asset

Now you need to create the templates to render the HTML. The BlogsEntryAssetRenderer is configured to use JSP templates to generate HTML for the Asset Publisher. You’ll learn more about how to do this next.

« Rendering an AssetConfiguring JSP Templates for an Asset Renderer »
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