Service Builder Application Using External Database via JDBC

This sample demonstrates how to connect a Liferay Service Builder application to an external database via a JDBC connection. Here, an external database means any database other than Liferay DXP’s database. For this sample to work correctly, you must prepare such an external database and configure Liferay DXP to use it. Follow the steps below to make the required preparations before deploying the application.

  1. Create the external database to which your Service Builder application will connect. For example, create a MariaDB database called external. Add a table to this database called country with a BIGINT column called Id and a VARCHAR(255) column called Name. Add at least one record to this table. Here are the MariaDB commands to accomplish this:

    create database external character set utf8;
    
    use external;
    
    create table country(id bigint not null primary key, name varchar(255));
    
    insert into country(id, name) values(1, 'Australia');
    

    Make sure that your database commands were successful: Running select * from country; should return the record you added.

  2. Create a portal-ext.properties file in your Liferay DXP instance’s [LIFERAY_HOME] folder (this folder should be marked by the presence of a .liferay-home file). In your portal-ext.properties file, define the details of your JDBC data source connection:

    jdbc.ext.driverClassName=org.mariadb.jdbc.Driver
    jdbc.ext.password=userpassword
    jdbc.ext.url=jdbc:mariadb://localhost/external?useUnicode=true&characterEncoding=UTF-8&useFastDateParsing=false
    jdbc.ext.username=yourusername
    

    Note that Liferay DXP’s primary data source is specified by the jdbc.default prefix. These details are often specified in a portal-setup-wizard.properties file. Here, we’ve chosen to use the jdbc.ext prefix for our alternate data source.

  3. Create a com.liferay.blade.samples.jdbcservicebuilder.service-log4j-ext.xml in your Liferay instance’s [LIFERAY_HOME]/osgi/log4 folder. Create this folder if it doesn’t yet exist. Add this content to the XML file that you created:

    <?xml version="1.0"?>
    <!DOCTYPE log4j:configuration SYSTEM "log4j.dtd">
    
    <log4j:configuration xmlns:log4j="http://jakarta.apache.org/log4j/">
        <category name="com.liferay.blade.samples.jdbcservicebuilder.service.impl">
            <priority value="INFO" />
        </category>
    </log4j:configuration>
    

    This XML file defines the log level for the classes in the com.liferay.blade.samples.jdbcservicebuilder.service.impl package. The com.liferay.blade.samples.jdbcservicebuilder.service.impl.CountryLocalServiceImpl is the class that will produce log messages when the sample portlet is viewed.

Now your sample is ready for deployment! Make sure to build and deploy each of the three modules that comprise the sample application:

  • jdbc-api
  • jdbc-service
  • jdbc-web

After these modules have been deployed, add the -web portlet to a Liferay DXP page.

Figure 1: This sample prints out the values previously inputted into the database.

Figure 1: This sample prints out the values previously inputted into the database.

A sample table is printed in the portlet’s view, representing the info inputted into the database.

What API(s) and/or code components does this sample highlight?

This sample demonstrates two ways to access data from an external database defined by a JDBC connection:

  • extract data directly from the raw data source by explicitly specifying a SQL query.
  • read data using the helper methods that Service Builder generates in your application’s persistence layer.

How does this sample leverage the API(s) and/or code component?

Once you’ve added the -web portlet to a page, the CountryLocalService.useJDBC method is invoked. This method accesses the database defined by the JDBC connection you specified and logs information about the rows in the country table to Liferay DXP’s log.

The first way of accessing data from the external database is to extract it directly from the raw data source by explicitly specifying a SQL query. This technique is demonstrated by the CountryLocalServiceImpl.useJDBC method. That method obtains the Spring-defined data source that’s injected into the countryPersistence bean, opens a new connection, and reads data from the data source. This is the technique used by the sample application to write the data to Liferay DXP’s log.

The second way of accessing data from the external database is to read data using the helper methods that Service Builder generates in your application’s persistence layer. This technique is demonstrated by the UseJDBC.getCountries method which first obtains an instance of the CountryLocalService OSGi service and then invokes countryLocalService.getCountries. The countryLocalService.getCountries and countryLocalService.getCountriesCount methods are two examples of the persistence layer helper methods that Service Builder generates. This is the technique used by the sample application to actually display the data. The portlet’s view.jsp uses the <search-container> JSP tag to display a list of results. The results are obtained by the UseJDBC.getCountries method mentioned above.

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