Running Service Builder and Understanding the Generated Code

This tutorial explains how to run Service Builder and provides an overview of the code that Service Builder generates. If you’d like to use Service Builder in your application but haven’t yet created a service.xml file, visit the Defining an Object-Relational Map with Service Builder tutorial and then come back to this one.

Running Service Builder

To build a service from a service.xml file, you can use Liferay Developer Studio or a terminal window. In this tutorial, you’ll refer to the Event Listing example project that’s referenced throughout the Liferay Service Builder tutorials.

Now let’s learn how to run Service Builder.

Using Liferay Developer Studio

From the Package Explorer, open the service.xml file from your *-service module’s root folder. By default, the file opens up in the Service Builder Editor. Make sure you are in Overview mode. Then click the Build Services button (Build Services) near the top-right corner of the view.

Make sure to click the Build Services button and not the Build WSDD button (Build WSDD) that appears next to it. Building the WSDDs won’t hurt anything, but you’ll generate files for the remote service instead of the local one. For information about WSDDs (web service deployment descriptors), please refer to the SOAP Web Services tutorial.

Figure 1: The Overview mode in the editor provides a nested outline which you can expand, a form for editing basic Service Builder attributes, and buttons for building services or building web service deployment descriptors.

Figure 1: The *Overview* mode in the editor provides a nested outline which you can expand, a form for editing basic Service Builder attributes, and buttons for building services or building web service deployment descriptors.

Another simple way to run Service Builder is to right-click on your project’s name in the Package Explorer and then select Liferaybuild-service.

After running Service Builder, your generated files are available. More information about the generated files appears below.

Using the Terminal

Open a terminal window and navigate to your module project’s root folder, which should be located in your Liferay Workspace’s modules directory. To learn more about creating your module project in a Liferay Workspace, visit the Creating Modules with Blade CLI tutorial. You can leverage the Service Builder Template to create your own predefined Service Builder project.

Liferay Workspace offers a Gradle or Maven build environment; this tutorial shows how to use both. Liferay is tool agnostic, however, and you can use other tools, as well.

For Gradle projects, enter the following command in your module project’s root folder to build your services:

gradlew buildService

If your module project uses Maven, you can build services running the following command from the module project’s root folder:

mvn service-builder:build

Important: The mvn service-builder:build command only works if you’re using the com.liferay.portal.tools.service.builder plugin version 1.0.145+. Maven projects using an earlier version of the Service Builder plugin should update their POM accordingly. See the Using Service Builder in a Maven Project tutorial for more information on using Maven to run Service Builder.

When the service has been successfully generated, a BUILD SUCCESSFUL message appears in your terminal window. You should also see that a large number of files have been generated in your project. These files include a model layer, service layer, and persistence layer. Don’t worry about the number of generated files–you’ll never have to customize more than three of them. To review the code that Service Builder generates for your entities, see the next section.

Understanding the Code Generated by Service Builder

Now you’ll examine the files Service Builder generated for your entity. Note that the files listed under Local Service and Remote Service below are only generated for an entity that has both local-service and remote-service attributes set to true. Service Builder generates services for these entities in two locations in your project. These locations use the package path that you specified in your service.xml file. For Liferay’s Bookmarks application, for example, these two locations are the following ones:

  • /bookmarks-api/src/main/java/com/liferay/bookmarks
  • /bookmarks-service/src/main/java/com/liferay/bookmarks

The bookmarks-api module contains the API for the Bookmarks project. All the classes and interfaces in the *-api module are packaged in a .jar file called PROJECT_NAME-api.jar in the module’s build/libs folder. This .jar file is generated whenever you compile and deploy your module. When deploying this JAR to Liferay, the necessary interfaces to define the service API are available.

The bookmarks-service module contains the implementation of the interfaces defined in the bookmarks-api module. These interfaces provide OSGi services for the portal instance to which your application is deployed. Service Builder generates classes and interfaces belonging to the persistence layer, service layer, and model layer in the /bookmarks-api/src/main/java/com/liferay/bookmarks and /bookmarks-service/src/main/java/com/liferay/bookmarks packages.

Now you’ll look at the classes and interfaces generated for the entities you specified. Each entity has similar classes generated for it, depending on what you specfied for them in the service.xml. You won’t have to customize more than three classes for each entity. These customizable classes are *LocalServiceImpl, *ServiceImpl, and *Impl.

  • Persistence

    • [ENTITY_NAME]Persistence: Persistence interface that defines CRUD methods for the entity such as create, remove, countAll, find, findAll, etc.
    • [ENTITY_NAME]PersistenceImpl: Persistence implementation class that implements [ENTITY_NAME]Persistence.
    • [ENTITY_NAME]Util: Persistence utility class that wraps [ENTITY_NAME]PersistenceImpl and provides direct access to the database for CRUD operations. This utility should only be used by the service layer; in your portlet classes, use [ENTITY_NAME]LocalServiceUtil or [ENTITY_NAME]ServiceUtil instead.

    Figure 2: Service Builder generates these persistence classes and interfaces. You shouldnt (and you wont need to) customize any of these classes or interfaces.

    Figure 2: Service Builder generates these persistence classes and interfaces. You shouldn't (and you won't need to) customize any of these classes or interfaces.

  • Local Service (generated for an entity only if an entity’s local-service attribute is set to true in service.xml)

    • [ENTITY_NAME]LocalService: Local service interface.
    • [ENTITY_NAME]LocalServiceImpl (LOCAL SERVICE IMPLEMENTATION): Local service implementation. This is the only class in the local service that you should modify manually. You can add custom business logic here. For any custom methods added here, Service Builder adds corresponding methods to the [ENTITY_NAME]LocalService interface the next time you run it.
    • [ENTITY_NAME]LocalServiceBaseImpl: Local service base implementation. This is an abstract class. Service Builder injects a number of instances of various service and persistence classes into this class. @abstract
    • [ENTITY_NAME]LocalServiceUtil: Local service utility class which wraps [ENTITY_NAME]LocalServiceImpl and serves as the primary local access point to the service layer.
    • [ENTITY_NAME]LocalServiceWrapper: Local service wrapper which implements [ENTITY_NAME]LocalService. This class is designed to be extended and it allows developers to customize the entity’s local services.

    Figure 3: Service Builder generates these service classes and interfaces. Only EventLocalServiceImpl allows custom methods to be added to the service layer.

    Figure 3: Service Builder generates these service classes and interfaces. Only EventLocalServiceImpl allows custom methods to be added to the service layer.

  • Remote Service (generated for an entity only if an entity’s remote-service attribute is not set to false in service.xml)

    • [ENTITY_NAME]Service: Remote service interface.
    • [ENTITY_NAME]ServiceImpl (REMOTE SERVICE IMPLEMENTATION): Remote service implementation. This is the only class in the remote service that you should modify manually. Here, you can write code that adds additional security checks and invokes the local services. For any custom methods added here, Service Builder adds corresponding methods to the [ENTITY_NAME]Service interface the next time you run it.
    • [ENTITY_NAME]ServiceBaseImpl: Remote service base implementation. This is an abstract class. @abstract
    • [ENTITY_NAME]ServiceUtil: Remote service utility class which wraps [ENTITY_NAME]ServiceImpl and serves as the primary remote access point to the service layer.
    • [ENTITY_NAME]ServiceWrapper: Remote service wrapper which implements [ENTITY_NAME]Service. This class is designed to be extended and it allows developers to customize the remote entity’s services.
    • [ENTITY_NAME]ServiceSoap: SOAP utility which the remote [ENTITY_NAME]ServiceUtil remote service utility can access.
    • [ENTITY_NAME]Soap: SOAP model, similar to [ENTITY_NAME]ModelImpl. [ENTITY_NAME]Soap is serializable; it does not implement [ENTITY_NAME].
  • Model

    • [ENTITY_NAME]Model: Base model interface. This interface and its [ENTITY_NAME]ModelImpl implementation serve only as a container for the default property accessors generated by Service Builder. Any helper methods and all application logic should be added to [ENTITY_NAME]Impl.
    • [ENTITY_NAME]ModelImpl: Base model implementation.
    • [ENTITY_NAME]: [ENTITY_NAME] model interface which extends [ENTITY_NAME]Model.
    • [ENTITY_NAME]Impl: (MODEL IMPLEMENTATION) Model implementation. You can use this class to add helper methods and application logic to your model. If you don’t add any helper methods or application logic, only the auto-generated field getters and setters are available. Whenever you add custom methods to this class, Service Builder adds corresponding methods to the [ENTITY_NAME] interface the next time you run it.
    • [ENTITY_NAME]Wrapper: Wrapper, wraps [ENTITY_NAME].

    Figure 4: Service Builder generates these model classes and interfaces. Only EventImpl allows custom methods to be added to the service layer.

    Figure 4: Service Builder generates these model classes and interfaces. Only `EventImpl` allows custom methods to be added to the service layer.

Each file that Service Builder generates is assembled from an associated FreeMarker template. You can find Service Builder’s FreeMarker templates in the portal-tools-service-builder module. For example, if you want to find out how a *ServiceImpl.java file is generated, just look at the service_impl.ftl template.

Of all the classes generated by Service Builder, only three should be manually modified: *LocalServiceImpl, *ServiceImpl and *Impl. If you manually modify the other classes, your changes are overwritten the next time you run Service Builder. Whenever you add methods to, remove methods from, or change a method signature of a *LocalServiceImpl class, *ServiceImpl class, or *Impl class, you should run Service Builder again to regenerate the affected interfaces and the service JAR.

Congratulations! You’ve generated your application’s initial model, persistence, and service layers and you understand the generated code.

What is Service Builder

Running Service Builder and Understanding the Generated Code

Understanding Service Context

Creating Local Services

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